Draft list for Polish Home Army 1944

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gebhk
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Re: Draft list for Polish Home Army 1944

Post by gebhk » Tue Feb 12, 2019 8:02 am

run out of ammo/break down on a double only so 1 in 36?
Any double makes for a rate of 6 in 36 or 1 in 6, same as a 1 on a single die! A double of one type (eg snake eyes) gives a ratio of 1 in 36.

where there actual reports of K type flamethrowers blowing up?
Not that I am aware of. It should be noted that the contraptions made during the uprising were not AFAIK 'K' types but various Heath Robinson jobs. A number of the latter did cause accidents apparently.

All that being said, it could be argued that putting any flamethrower into the hands of an inexperienced youngster would be tempting fate.......

These are two I might work in as home made grenade launchers - the latter were probably those mistaken as home made mortars
i assume both were dangerous to the user? :lol:

I guess it is the Lopuski grenade launchers that are commonly mistaken (due to their size and appearance) as mortars. However they were true grenade launchers, in that their projectiles were both designed to be used by hand. They are also on record as the most prone to dangerous accidents - at least 2 of them (out of a maximum total of 25) suffered explosions in the barrels during firing, most likely caused by imperfections in the tubes which were made of material (sewer pipe) never designed for the purpose.

The spring catapults of various types were designed primarily as anti-tank weapons and fired Molotov cocktails. No nasty accidents AFAIK. However, one has to consider that any glass bottle filled with highly combustible liquid that bursts into flames when the bottle is broken, is an accident waiting to happen (in storage and transit as well as in use)! This of course applies to any Molotov cocktails, even more so when 'launched by hand'. The more 'primitive' versions (both types were used in the WU) which relied on a lit fuse being attached before throwing, were paradoxically safer in storage and transport than their chemically ignited brethren, but created their own hazards once the fuse was lit!

they got the Hetzer going did they not?
I believe they did

Was not aware of the size of Soviet air drops
These were substantial (150 tons) but did not commence until (the night of) 13/14 September and continued nightly until 28/29 September with a break 18-21 September. Drops were carried out by the 2nd Night Bomber Regiment of the LWP and the Soviet 9th Night Guards Bomber Division. According to Soviet sources the weapons' contribution to this total included 156 mortars, 505 A/T rifles, 1189 rifles, 1478 SMGs and one 45mm A/T gun. Due to the method of delivery, the value of these supplies to the insurgents was substantially less and is detailed in my earlier post. Food was the other contribution consisting, in the main, of rye bread biscuit, millet, US-manufactured tinned food and a white fatty substance of unknown origin referred to by the insurgents as 'monkey fat'.

The main point being, of course, that these weapons only became available in any noticeable quantity in the last two weeks of the Uprising.
Last edited by gebhk on Tue Feb 12, 2019 9:27 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Truscott Trotter
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Re: Draft list for Polish Home Army 1944

Post by Truscott Trotter » Tue Feb 12, 2019 8:22 am

I presume there would be a longer range and greater impact from the Lopuski Vs the spring fired molotov's?

gebhk
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Re: Draft list for Polish Home Army 1944

Post by gebhk » Tue Feb 12, 2019 8:47 am

TT- It just remains to be said, that you are doing a splendid job of bringing a bewildering complexity into the confines of what is, by definition, a simplification without, at the same time, losing the flavour of the events. Our hobby, at its core, contains the delicate paradox of using utterly awful events as the basis for a harmless and enjoyable pastime. In this respect, the Warsaw Uprising is particularly challenging - the Wola/Ochota massacre being certainly among the worst war atrocities of the 20th Century - and again I think you are treading this fine path with skill.

gebhk
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Re: Draft list for Polish Home Army 1944

Post by gebhk » Tue Feb 12, 2019 9:23 am

I presume there would be a longer range and greater impact from the Lopuski Vs the spring fired molotov's?
Difficult to say, exactly (well, that's bleedin' 'elpful!).

I did try to find some record of ranges for the catapults and other spring-loaded Molotov cocktail lobbers and found zilch. I will try e-mailing some potential sources. My initial thoughts would be that a catapult would double or triple the range of a hand-thrown grenade.

Regarding destructive power, it needs to be clear that these are different types of 'round'. The Lopuski is a conventional artillery piece while the catapults were designed (like the Szuster launchers) as anti-tank weapons. Of course, like normal weapons of their respective families, both could be used alternatively in extremis, but you should not expect best results from such usage. The effects of the spring-loads would be the same as for any Molotov cocktail - just with greater range.

Calculating the impact of Lopuski rounds is more difficult. While there are standard formulae for calculating the effect of rounds based on quantity of HE, Shrapnel and casing parameters, etc, these are based on HE and other materials manufactured to precise tolerances. The shear variability of explosive mixture and building materials as well as manufacturing process, makes these formulae virtually useless for calculating the effect of Lopuski rounds. Rules for small IEDs/nail bombs/pipe bombs would probably be appropriate. The impact of a frag grenade fired from a Lopuski launcher would be much the same as that of a hand-thrown one.

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