Forests vs Orchards

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GavinP
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Re: Forests vs Orchards

Post by GavinP » Mon Jun 24, 2019 10:47 am

Who uses 6 inch by 4 inch fields tho? I've never seen one on a table anyway.

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Truscott Trotter
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Re: Forests vs Orchards

Post by Truscott Trotter » Mon Jun 24, 2019 10:50 am

GavinP wrote:
Mon Jun 24, 2019 10:47 am
Who uses 6 inch by 4 inch fields tho? I've never seen one on a table anyway.
Hobbits?

gebhk
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Re: Forests vs Orchards

Post by gebhk » Mon Jun 24, 2019 11:22 am

Contrarius makes a good point, however we need to bear in mind that the poor peasants' 60-120 or 40-60 acres would not necessarily be in one piece. Also practice in field demarcation varied from one part of Europe to another - I don't think hedging was ever popular in Poland but very common in Britain and Denmark. Planting practice and horticulture also varied - for example the common practice in Central and Eastern Europe of growing lupins in fields to fix nitrogen does not seem to appear in Western Europe. Furthermore wartime demands, neglect and loss of expertise may have an effect on the way fields are managed (for example growth of unchecked weeds, inadequate pruning). Add terrain effects and, all in all, endless variety in endless combinations.

Which brings me to the point (at long last) that we either accept fields/orchards/wooeds as specified in the rules as handy abstractions to spice up the game or, in the alternative, agree specific arrangements with the opponent on a case by case basis. There seems little point in trying to legislate in the mainstream rules for infinity :).

the softer woods of fruit trees
Something nor right there. Most fruit trees have some of the hardest and most close-grained woods there are which is what made them popular as material for rulers and other technical drawing tools before the advent of plastics. Though I can see how a hard wood would make sharper, bigger and more lethal splinters than a soft wood, so the basic premise seems reasonable.

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batesmotel34
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Re: Forests vs Orchards

Post by batesmotel34 » Mon Jun 24, 2019 2:24 pm

For what it's worth, I think the increased effectiveness of a mortar barrage against troops in woods/orchards is primarily due to air burst of rounds rather than additional injuries due to splinters, etc from the wood. This has always been my interpretation and I don't remember seeing an explanation in the rules of the reasoning for the difference in effectiveness.

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Seret
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Re: Forests vs Orchards

Post by Seret » Mon Jun 24, 2019 2:56 pm

batesmotel34 wrote:
Sun Jun 23, 2019 1:50 pm
Anyone know if the size of fields/open areas in the bocage would be at all typical of field sizes in general in NWE?
No, one of the defining features of the bocage is fairly small fields (the others being gnarly hedges, sunken roads and small woods/orchards).

At CoC's ground scale a 12" field wouldn't be too unrealistic for bocage country. I don't think I've ever seen a 6x4" field on the table either!
batesmotel34 wrote:
Mon Jun 24, 2019 2:24 pm
For what it's worth, I think the increased effectiveness of a mortar barrage against troops in woods/orchards is primarily due to air burst of rounds rather than additional injuries due to splinters, etc from the wood.
100%. Compared to the huge additional effect of turning your ground burst HE into airburst, the effect of wood splinters is much less.

gebhk
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Re: Forests vs Orchards

Post by gebhk » Mon Jun 24, 2019 7:44 pm

Compared to the huge additional effect of turning your ground burst HE into airburst, the effect of wood splinters is much less.
Agree totally in relation to modern weapons. A splendid illustration can be found in the Sikorski Museum in London - the sideroom dedicated to cavalry stuff has an Adrian with a substantial lump of shrapnel firmly imbedded in its crown. Its hapless owner was rudely awakened by an artillery round bursting in the canopy of the orchard tree he was blissfully slumbering under in September 1939.

My comments were directed at solid shot weapons that BvW started out with - mea culpa for not making that clear.

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