Blinds and how they are represented

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Sadurian
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Blinds and how they are represented

Post by Sadurian »

I am, first and foremost, a modeller at heart. Consequently I like to model appropriate little pieces for the table in lieu of plastic counters or dice.* Bearing that in mind, I was thinking of how to model Blinds. The book suggests their approximate size and shape and that they be 'played' as units until being somehow uncovered, but I wonder how others actually represent them.

I was thinking of an oval of thin mdf of approximately the right dimensions with sculpted terrain and a couple of scout figures based on it, essentially a diorama showing the scouting patrol. What strikes me is that such a large base would be cumbersome to lay across terrain (and potentially other figures).

Do others bother to model Blinds or do you usually just have thin card or paper templates? Do such Blinds last long enough in the game that I should be worried about moving them about, or are they likely to vanish in short order? Any other ideas at how to represent them?


*One of my pet peeves is a table of well-painted miniatures on lovingly sculpted terrain with a detritus of dice, counters, rules, and pieces of paper/rulebooks ruining the effect.

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Vis Bellica
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Re: Blinds and how they are represented

Post by Vis Bellica »

I use laminated oval Blinds with large symbols (the country's flag, a symbol representing the country, unit markings) that don't crush scenery or models, and are generally flexible enough to be placed almost anywhere on the tabletop.

I agree with you about the annoyance of seeing gaming detritus mixed with beautifully painted figures, but as Blinds tend to be used only at the beginning of a game, or with reinforcements, I find I don't mind them on the tabletop: they make me think of situation maps or even the animations you get on the TV showing where troops moved in a battle.

If you were to model them more solidly than laminated paper, with figures representing scouts etc, I think using a base the size of a CoC jump-off point would be better, and just ask players to be reasonable/sensible when deploying from the Blind.

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SteveBurt
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Re: Blinds and how they are represented

Post by SteveBurt »

I use pink and blue ovals of card with letters (A..L) on them. These work with all nationalities (and eras), and they can sit on terrain. Anything with modelling on it won't sit nicely on bits of terrain.
Not sure how others remember which blind represents what - I find the letters very useful - just note down which letter represents what.
Blinds tend not to be on the table for very long in any case.

Archdukek
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Re: Blinds and how they are represented

Post by Archdukek »

Like Robert and Steve I am happy to use laminated card as Blinds. You could use a CoC jump off point and have a clear acrylic blind shape you can use as a guide to the area covered when deploying, but I suspect you would forever be putting it on the table when measuring Spotting ranges unless you decide always to measure to the centre of the blind rather than the nearest point.

It's also worth keeping in mind that it is usually the attackers who make the most use of blinds. Defenders can use any piece of terrain and don't necessarily use a physical blind on the table unless they move.

For defenders my preference is to use a set of numbered counters which are placed on the table in potential defensive positions. I then make a note of which is a unit and it simplifies things for the attacker who simply states which counter (piece of terrain) he is spotting into.

I have seen photos of a game where the players were using clear acrylic blinds on stilts to balance over the terrain which looked a neat idea.

John

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Sadurian
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Re: Blinds and how they are represented

Post by Sadurian »

Thanks chaps.

Until John reminded me, I hadn't thought about defenders mostly using terrain features as potential unit positions instead of Blinds. Obviously I'd read that rule but for some reason then forgotten it. I can use individual figures on counters to show potential hidden units. I foresee modelling some more creative ones there - a family of rabbits or badgers, a lost dog, a wild boar... anything than might disturb the cover and suggest that someone is in there.

For Blinds proper it looks like I'll go ahead with some thin mdf ovals (maybe a bit smaller than the Blind size, as Vis Bellica suggests) and use magnetic attachment points to change the figures and thus the army represented. If they aren't going to last long on the table (as SteveBurt points out) then I can live with them being perched over terrain (I quite like the idea of elevating them on little legs).

Charles Eckart
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Re: Blinds and how they are represented

Post by Charles Eckart »

I use 6 inch clear plastic ovals with red or blue outlined edges and a small red or blue number when a blind is on the table. Also terrain pieces when blinds are "hidden".

The clear ovals give an appearance of how positions might appear on a map and are sometimes overlooked by an opponent making them into "true" blinds. Just remember to NOT overlook them yourself.

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Truscott Trotter
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Re: Blinds and how they are represented

Post by Truscott Trotter »

Charles Eckart wrote:I use 6 inch clear plastic ovals with red or blue outlined edges and a small red or blue number when a blind is on the table. Also terrain pieces when blinds are "hidden".

The clear ovals give an appearance of how positions might appear on a map and are sometimes overlooked by an opponent making them into "true" blinds. Just remember to NOT overlook them yourself.
I think this idea is the best one for me :D

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