Japanese purchases for lists for 1943-onward?

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EccentricOwl
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Japanese purchases for lists for 1943-onward?

Post by EccentricOwl »

Hey there. I know that there's supposedly a Far East book coming at some point in the near future for Chain of Command, and I'll eagerly buy that.

However, until then I'm curious - is the "Japan 1941-1942" the best list to approximate the formations of the Empire? I'm trying to buy the requisite minis and it's proving to be a bit fiddly.

And, out of curiosity, what sort of models or kits might I want to buy in preparation for a later-war Japanese list?


...the same question for the French as well, actually.

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Truscott Trotter
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Re: Japanese purchases for lists for 1943-onward?

Post by Truscott Trotter »

FWIW I built my Japanese for Early war then I can easily do the later forces as the number of men in the formation got smaller as time went on.

Most models from earlier as far as guns and AFV's are still in use but there are some that were only used later or more usually kept for home island defence. This included most of the SPG and heavier tanks.
I have a Shinto Chi-Ha as my latest common tank.

EccentricOwl
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Re: Japanese purchases for lists for 1943-onward?

Post by EccentricOwl »

Truscott Trotter wrote:
Tue Oct 20, 2020 7:32 pm
FWIW I built my Japanese for Early war then I can easily do the later forces as the number of men in the formation got smaller as time went on.

Most models from earlier as far as guns and AFV's are still in use but there are some that were only used later or more usually kept for home island defence. This included most of the SPG and heavier tanks.
I have a Shinto Chi-Ha as my latest common tank.
That's greaet advice. Thank you kindly, I won't stress then. :)

Do we think there's any kind of official (or semi-official) list for France on the horizon? Or should I recommend someone just use the French Infantry Platoon (p52) from Blitzkrieg?

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MLB
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Re: Japanese purchases for lists for 1943-onward?

Post by MLB »

The basic IJA infantry regiment structure remained much the same throughout the war. You are looking at a four squad platoon, with three rifle squads and one grenade discharger squad. As the war progressed and casualties were not replaced men were often re-assigned from the grenade discharger squad to the rifle squads to the point the GD squad may be only one GD team. What this means is that if you have an early war platoon then you have all the figures you need for a regular platoon throughout the war.

Supports don’t vary much either. Tanks like the Chi Ha and Ha Go were present throughout. The later model Chi Ha shinoto with the 47mm gun and the similar calibre AT gun would be two of the few additions you might need. Even if you want to play Manchuria in 45 you will find that most late war Japanese armour wasn’t present as it had been reserved for the defence of the home islands.

Where things get a bit more interesting is the Pacific island defence as these were often ad hoc mixtures, but not much in the way of unusual support weapons (more likely things like bunkers, spider holes, booby traps etc).

Is there a specific late war campaign/theatre you have in mind, China, Burma, Philippines, Pacific islands?
The Tactical Painter https://thetacticalpainter.blogspot.com
Painting little soldiers for tactical battles on the table top

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agentbalzac
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Re: Japanese purchases for lists for 1943-onward?

Post by agentbalzac »

Good tips, all.

Indeed we know that spider holes (and likely log bunkers and other defensive supports) will be in the mix for the Japanese for late war - Rich already posted a Youtube video on making spider holes which I used to make some of my own.

You may also consider making/acquiring some sort of dug-in buried position upon which you can mount your existing tank turrets as otherwise mechanically unserviceable vehicles were often emplaced in this way.

Len Tracey
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Re: Japanese purchases for lists for 1943-onward?

Post by Len Tracey »

G'day EccentricOwl,
TT & MLB have pretty much nailed it for the Japanese.

In early 1941, the Japanese Army settled on a standard Company organization that it retained for the rest of the war. This allocated a strength of 190 all ranks to the Company and defined it as a HQ and three Rifle Platoons. Internal organization was determined by tactical doctrine. Each Rifle Platoon was defined as a HQ of 1 officer and 1 SNCO, along with four 13 man squads. Three of these were LMG squads equipped with one LMG while the fourth was a Grenade Discharger squad equipped with three GD. The Company had no heavy weapons in its organization.

The parent Infantry Battalion included a Machine Gun Company and an Infantry Gun Platoon that provided support to the rifle companies. The MG Company had three MG Platoons with four Type 92 "Woodpecker" MMG each (total 12 MMG), along with an ATR Platoon with two Type 97 20mm ATR. The Battalion Gun Platoon had two Type 92 70mm Infantry guns. These were deployed to support company actions as required. At Regimental level there was the Regimental Gun Company with four Type 41 75mm Mountain Guns (manned by Infantry crews, not Artillery). Although these could fire indirect missions, they were more commonly used in the direct fire mode as Infantry guns.

From 1944 onwards, the IJA logistic system virtually collapsed, depriving their units of reinforcements and supplies. Tactical doctrine was amended to reflect the deteriorating circumstances. AS a result, Squad size generally shrunk to 10 men. The Type 89 Grenade Discharger declined in use due to lack of reliable ammunition, despite the fact it was a very popular weapon with Japanese troops. Hence the platoon's fourth squad was often used to reinforce the LMG squads as its GD became inoperable. Anti-armour defence came to rely on improvised means such as the ubiquitous lunge mine. With regard to AFV, the new SPG (75mm gun and 105mm howitzer) only really made an appearance in the Philippines.

Hope this helps.
Cheers,
Len

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