CoC North West Frontier

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oozeboss
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Re: CoC North West Frontier

Post by oozeboss »

BaronVonWreckedoften wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 11:30 am
oozeboss wrote:
Sat Jun 27, 2020 5:46 am
John Masters (my inspiration & go to guy, again from Bugles And A Tiger): "On the government side, armourers removed the propellant charges from cartridges, replaced the low-explosive cordite with a high explosive, and then dropped the doctored clips about. The tribesman, always short of ammunition, picked them up, with bad results for his hand or face when he fired his treasure trove."

Pashtun Tribal Characteristic "Ammunition Shortage" meets Shabby Imperial Trick "Ammunition Cache". :twisted:
Worth noting that in 1970s Northern Ireland a British general reportedly rejected an offer to do the same thing to the IRA, calling it "ungentlemanly".
Masters again (same brilliant book): "I said above that we were not to be ruthless. Ruthlessness, however, is relative, and the definition used on the Frontier was the Pathan definition".

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Capt Fortier
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Re: CoC North West Frontier

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I'd not heard/seen "Bugles and a Tiger" before, but what a ripper of a book! Can see how you've been inspired.
Capt Fortier

“Un optimiste, c'est un homme qui plante deux glands et qui s'achète un hamac.” - Jean de Lattre de Tassigny

poiter50
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Re: CoC North West Frontier

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He's a great writer, his Chindit one is excellent as well.

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oozeboss
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Re: CoC North West Frontier

Post by oozeboss »

poiter50 wrote:
Mon Jun 29, 2020 9:46 am
He's a great writer, his Chindit one is excellent as well.
I actually got this book because of his "Chindit one" - The Road Past Mandalay - which I wanted through my long held interest in the Burma campaign. That book also covered his participation in the Middle East campaigns of 1941, which inevitably also got me all excited about the potential of an Iraq & Lebanon campaign (my wife being born in Australia basically because he mother fell in love with "big laughing men" from here who occupied her Lebanese village on the completion of that campaign, and became determined to move to their country - as she did about 12 years later - playing no small interest in that passion play). I got the earlier one from an initial sense of completeness, but it supplanted even The Road Past Mandalay as the primary source of my inspiration in our hobby.
Last edited by oozeboss on Mon Jun 29, 2020 10:10 am, edited 1 time in total.

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oozeboss
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Re: CoC North West Frontier

Post by oozeboss »

Capt Fortier wrote:
Mon Jun 29, 2020 9:43 am
I'd not heard/seen "Bugles and a Tiger" before, but what a ripper of a book! Can see how you've been inspired.
It certainly lit a pretty fierce fire for me, and I have a plethora of quotes from that book scattered throughout as notes in the rules I am preparing. I will also unashamedly confess that the Gurkha platoon I am planning to raise will display the iconography of his 2nd/ 4th Prince of Wales Own Gurkha Rifles (who, with Masters front & present, were at hand when the Fakir of Ipi's HQ at Arsal Kot was captured). I cannot recommend this or the subsequent The Road Past Mandalay (which covers his WW2 experiences in Iraq, Syria, Iran & Burma - the latter with both the Chindits and later, a regular British division) highly enough.

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Capt Fortier
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Re: CoC North West Frontier

Post by Capt Fortier »

Had a quick flick through a pdf version online and liked the look of it so much it is already on order!
Capt Fortier

“Un optimiste, c'est un homme qui plante deux glands et qui s'achète un hamac.” - Jean de Lattre de Tassigny

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oozeboss
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Re: CoC North West Frontier

Post by oozeboss »

Capt Fortier wrote:
Mon Jun 29, 2020 10:10 am
Had a quick flick through a pdf version online and liked the look of it so much it is already on order!
I guarantee that, at the very least, you will not be disappointed. He is very open about his own failings, and avoids resorting to jingoistic cliches.

BaronVonWreckedoften
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Re: CoC North West Frontier

Post by BaronVonWreckedoften »

oozeboss wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 10:10 pm
Masters again (same brilliant book): "I said above that we were not to be ruthless. Ruthlessness, however, is relative, and the definition used on the Frontier was the Pathan definition".
Excellent comment - when I used to be a guest lecturer at the National Army Museum, I always explained to questioners that the British Army generally treated its enemy (and their attendant civilians) with the same level of respect that they treated it. I wish I'd had that quote to hand back then!
No plan survives first contact with the dice.

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oozeboss
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Re: CoC North West Frontier

Post by oozeboss »

BaronVonWreckedoften wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 12:04 pm
oozeboss wrote:
Sun Jun 28, 2020 10:10 pm
Masters again (same brilliant book): "I said above that we were not to be ruthless. Ruthlessness, however, is relative, and the definition used on the Frontier was the Pathan definition".
Excellent comment - when I used to be a guest lecturer at the National Army Museum, I always explained to questioners that the British Army generally treated its enemy (and their attendant civilians) with the same level of respect that they treated it. I wish I'd had that quote to hand back then!
You'd like this then, from That Book: "The tribesmen looked on war as an honourable, exciting and manly exercise. When they had no quarrel with the British or the Afghans they arranged one among themselves. Many of them clearly thought that the Government of India organized Frontier wars on the same basis. At least, there seems no other reasonable explanation of the fact that when a campaign was over scores of Pathans used to apply to the Political Agents for the Frontier Medal with the appropriate clasp. I think that their request was reasonable. As they pointed out, they were British subjects and the had fought in the battles so thoughtfully organized by the King Emperor Across the Seas. Indeed, without their co-operation the war would have been a complete fiasco and no one would have got any medals."

It's very easy to get passionate about these somewhat idiosyncratic campaigns, of this time, in this terrain, and with these protagonists.

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